Happy Father’s Day!

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He shrugged away attempts to celebrate Father’s Day. “No need, lah,” he said, when I suggested we go somewhere special for breakfast.

So we had breakfast at one of our usual haunts, I baked half a chicken for lunch, and we spent the day lazing at home, before going to my mother-in-law’s for dinner.

An ordinary Sunday, just the way he wanted. No fanfare, no extravagant meals, no presents.

Happy Father’s Day to the man who gave me the greatest gifts in life – our children, and the choice to stay home with them.

Pox-free

She’s been given the all clear – 13 days after she came down with chicken pox. There are just a couple of scabs which have “dried nicely”, said the doctor, who has declared her fit to return to school, to her dismay.

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The past two weeks has been rather unusual for us, since we’re used to being out and about most days. Even if we were to spend a lazy day at home on a weekend, it’s by choice. But we didn’t have a choice the last two weeks. We couldn’t go out, more specifically, Shannon couldn’t go out, which meant I couldn’t go out most times. I think she took it better than me. At the same time, we couldn’t invite people over. And she had to be kept away from the neighbours she usually runs around with. What could have been a trying two weeks of cabin fever was made better by several factors:

1) SEA Games!

It’s the best diversion ever. The timing could not have been better. We have been cheering for Team Singapore from our couch, during the swimming heats in the morning, taking a break after that until one or two events in the afternoon. Then capping off each night cheering for the Singapore swimmers. The kids are now on first name basis with the TeamSG swimmers, nevermind if we’ve never met them before. Oh and a couple of regional ones too, for eg, the iron lady from Vietnam, who like Joseph, has the midas touch. “Not Anh Vien again,” they would groan, when they see her in the line-up. Her appearance often meant everyone else would have to settle for fighting for silver.

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The competitive one at home kept his own scores, noted the records, so he could find out and announce who has the games record, before the TV commentator could say his piece.

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2) Visits

While we couldn’t invite people over, I was very, very thankful for those who came by to spend time with the kids. Their ah ma, grandma, and their two yiyis – my sisters. One came by to spend the afternoon so my husband and I could have the time off, the other brought Jason out for a concert and yummy dinner.

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3) Cheerful Shannon

She was delighted about not having to go to school, so she dealt with everything else cheerfully.

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Best of all, her extended time at home meant she left her mark everywhere.

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Pox

For some reason, I escaped the chicken pox virus when I was young. I worried about catching it when I was pregnant with Jason. I had a scare once when I saw some blisters on my body. It turned out to be an allergic reaction. I wasn’t so lucky the next time. I had a difficult pregnancy when I had Shannon, was on bed rest for four months because of constant spotting. When it finally let up in the fifth month, I came down with chicken pox – on the exact same day as Jason, on my birthday. The irony of it all.

After the initial panic, I read that the second trimester was probably the safest time to catch chicken pox while pregnant. Not that it was any comfort to me then. Jason’s blisters cleared in less than a week after he took a course of anti viral medicine, acyclovia. The doctor suggested I not take the mediciine. My high fever went on for two weeks, as did the blisters. I was finally admitted to KK Hospital and given the appropriate meds (I can’t remember if it’s acyclovia), before being discharged after two nights.

With all that I had to go through, we thought, and hoped, that Shannon might be immune to chicken pox. Well, we found out the answer this week. Nope, not at all. She came down with the pox last Friday, caught from a classmate, and let’s just say the June holidays did not start the way I had envisioned.

The moment I spotted a watery blister on her forehead, I warned her not to burst it. And in the next moment, she did exactly what I told her NOT to do. Oh well.

We brought her to the polyclinic the next day, where we were given ‘VIP” treatment: She was whisked to an isolation room, seen by the doctor within minutes, her papa got her medicine in an amazingly short time while we went back to the car to wait, and we were out of there in no time. All this while the polyclinic was packed to the brim as it usually is on a typical Saturday. #thankful

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And while I said the June holidays did not get off to the start I had envisioned, it’s a different case from Shannon’s point of view. She attends childcare and does not usually have school holidays though we do take her out of school on many days. She’s wisened up to the fact that her korkor has school holidays. Last weekend was the start of the holidays. When the cheerful doctor announced that she would be given two week’s MC, the grin on Shannon’s face said it all.

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So despite the fever, itch and discomfort, she has been having the time of her life at home.

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Check out that blister on her forehead…wpid-imag2321.jpg

We postponed holiday plans and cancelled a birthday dinner at a restaurant for their papa this week since Shannon is stuck at home.

Making a birthday card for papa.

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We celebrated at home instead.

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This picture sums it all up: Trying not to look too pleased about having chicken pox…

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Corporate training

When I was seriously considering an offer to teach in a junior college several years ago, my family (of teachers) was against it. Said my mum, sister, husband, in no particular order:

“A new teacher will have to pull longer hours. You will have less flexibility than a reporting job.”

“The holidays are not worth it; you don’t get to enjoy the full holidays anyway.”

“Interaction with students is over-rated, many don’t appreciate what their teachers do for them.”

I took in their comments and remained as a reporter for several more years.

But since I left ST, I’ve taken on a couple of teaching stints. I’ve taught secondary/JC students short media courses, I’ve taken a class of journalism undergraduates for one semester, and I’ve also done some corporate training – teaching English to adults in a corporate setting.

The corporate training stint was something I thought long and hard about before taking up. I’ve not been formally trained to teach English but had to come up with my own training syllabus based on the organisation’s needs. I was most stressed out about this job before the lessons started and almost regretted taking it up. It has meant week after week of lesson preparation. It has meant I’ve blogged less in the last few months. But four months later, I can safely say, this has been my favourite stint so far.

This group of employees from the organisation’s quality management unit deal with complaints from the public. A LOT of complaints. On all sorts of issues. Their job is to reply emails and take calls politely. Some of them have been with the organisation for many years, and some do not have a good grasp of Grammar or know how to write succinct replies. So in the last four months, we have focused on Grammar rules, using Public Relations skills in replies, as well as going through each of the replies to see how they can be improved.

The group of them in their 30s to 50s, are down-to-earth, enthusiastic, and appreciative of the lessons. They had asked their management for lessons so as to better do their job. I found them very quiet in the first few lessons, and started to think of ways and topics to draw them out. I’m happy to say that by the last lesson, all would frequently volunteer their answers, argue cheerfully with one another about the correct use of Grammar, and confidently question me about things they did not quite understand.

I conducted the last lesson a week ago. I came away with a newfound respect for people who handle public complaints, some of which are rude or downright unreasonable. I admire how they stay calm on the phone with people shouting at them. I take my hat off how they politely reply to each email, even apologising for issues they are not directly responsible for. Their English may not be perfect but you can’t fault them on their professionalism.

Best of all, they’re appreciative of the lessons. I realise it takes very little to make a teacher’s day. A word of thanks, a note about how it is useful to their daily work, and a comment about how they have started using some templates we came up with together. These are all it takes to put a smile on my face. Thank you.

The over-scheduled child

For the last two weeks, Jason led the life of an over-scheduled child.

Ironically it happened after exams ended because of a post-exam activity we signed him up for – Conversational Malay lessons offered by the school, conducted after school every day for two weeks. It’s a new language to him, it’s free, it’s useful in Singapore and Malaysia, so why not?

So for the last fortnight, his schedule looked something like this:

Mon: School, Malay, Soccer (ends at 6pm)

Tue: School, Malay (ends at 4pm)

Wed: School, Malay, Soccer (ends at 6pm)

Thurs: School, Malay, Piano (ends at 5pm)

Friday: School, Malay (ends at 3.30pm)

The timing of the lessons vary but he generally ends at 4pm or 6pm most days, instead of 1.30pm or 12.30pm. It has meant that I have had a chance to finish up freelance work, arrange lunches with friends and had more me-time generally.

It has also meant that he is tired, cranky, has little to no time for homework, reading, soccer with the neighbours, playing, doing nothing at home, and so on. I felt sorry for him. The protected time he has to play is lost. So are our after school chats over lunch. He is so tired after Malay or soccer, I get mostly one-word replies. Yucks.

The good thing is there is no homework for this class. It’s purely learning the spoken language, and any work given is done within class time. He has also picked up and taught me several phrases which will come in useful when we travel to Malaysia.

Today is the last day of his Malay lessons. While I enjoyed the greater amount of “freedom” the last two weeks, I’m kind of looking forward to having lunch together and spending afternoons with him. I’m also glad we have managed to keep weekends free of classes for him.

While learning something new is a good reason to go for class, you can have too much of a good thing. Thankfully this is just a two-week programme. It is a good reminder not to over-schedule him. At least not now. I’m told such a timetable is the norm for a pupil in Primary 5 and 6. Sigh.

A Math Lesson

This mid-year exams hasn’t been much different from last year’s. In terms of enthusiasm, mine is still higher than Jason’s. So exam revision is still largely me prodding, him plodding. It has reached a point where I tell him what I think he should do to revise, and whether or not he does it, is up to him. There is only that much hand-holding I can and want to do. He’s already in Primary 3, he has to know the consequences of not studying at some point, and better now than later, I figure.

But because he understands his lessons fairly quickly, he is lazy, and thinks he can get away with it.

“Try some of these questions from the Math assessment book,” I tell him.

“I already know how to do them,” he claims.

I left him alone for math, and concentrated on getting him to revise Chinese and Science. Chinese being the subject he struggles with the most, and science being the new subject this year. English is left aside because there simply isn’t enough time to work on it. His love for reading will have to translate magically into decent scores in exams.

The result? Decent scores in English, Science and even Chinese. The shocker came in mathematics. He scored some 15 marks lower than his previous exams. I was surprised; he was shocked. He never expected to get those marks. It’s the first time since he started school that he broke down and cried over academics.

I was pragmatic rather than angry – and took the chance to repeat all I have said to him: You reap what you sow, hard work gets you everywhere etc. I thought if this lesson hit home hard enough, and became a wake-up call for him, it could well be a blessing in disguise.

Until I saw the exam paper, and saw how his carelessness(2069 became 2096 in his working), over-confidence (not drawing diagram which would have helped) and lack of practice (’nuff said) contributed to his scores. Then I got mad.

I wrangled a tearful agreement from him to work harder the next time round, do some work during the June holidays, and left it as that. That was two weeks ago.

His papa got him a math assessment book from Popular and I suggested he attempt some questions in there yesterday.

“Why must I do it?” was his immediate reply, although he did do the sums in the end.

So now I’m not sure if he’s really learnt his lesson.

Happy Mother’s Day!

I don’t usually plan things way ahead, but three months ago, we planned for an extended family gathering at my place. We set the date on May 10 because my cousin, Kevin, who now lives in Switzerland, would be back with his wife, Steffi, for a week. I had been meaning to invite my grandma and other relatives over so it was a good chance for everyone to gather.

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Only in recent weeks did I realise Mother’s Day falls on May 10!

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As it turned out, Mother’s Day was perfect for a family gathering, where we honoured all the mothers in the family. (Photobombed by Shannon)

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We had a lovely evening catching up over yummy food. I’m not sure how Shannon got herself in so many pictures when she spent a good part of the evening playing outside with our neighbours…

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The kids wondered how our little flat could fit 20 relatives.

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A good dessert by Jason capped off the evening – he made all (20!) of us baked pear, served with ice-cream. It went from the oven to our stomachs in 10 minutes and I have no pictures to show for it, unfortunately. Next time!

A group picture to remember the evening by!

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It was a weekend of celebration. On Saturday, we celebrated at my Mother-in-law’s. Food was yummy and we forgot to take a picture! Kids with their Ah ma below.

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On Sunday evening, my aunt said to me, “So sorry you had to spend Mother’s Day cooking for us!”

“It’s my pleasure,” I said. And it is. My sister helped to cook some food and we bought the rest. What is a day’s food preparation compared to the daily lunches and dinners that grandma cooked during my school days when she lived with us?

Or the hours grandma spent, bent over a charcoal stove to make her signature cabbage duck stew every Chinese New Year – which no one else in the family has been able to replicate as yet.

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Hope you had a good Mother’s Day too!

Reconnecting with a teacher

I didn’t set out to be a journalist. When I was in the communications school in NTU, we had to decide which division to go to in our third year. We got a taste of the four divisions (then) in our first two years in school. I wasn’t interested in communications research or public relations. Between broadcast and journalism, broadcast seemed more fun. For some reason, the broadcast division was oversubscribed that year. The lecturers must have done such a great job, we all wanted to go in there.

Then I had a chat with Mr Tan Lai Kim who taught me a news writing module. I think the lecturers were asked to even out the spread of students. He spoke to me about considering journalism since I did well in the module. I can’t remember exactly what he said, but he managed to persuade me to change my mind. I’ve not looked back since. I’ve never regretted not going into the broadcast division.  I went on to join the campus newspaper Nanyang Chronicle where I met my husband. Not long after graduation, I joined ST and spent 12 years there.

I lost touch with Mr Tan after graduation. In the last 16 years, I’ve thought about the man who steered me on the path of journalism. For some reason, I remembered him saying he would go back to the US to retire on a farm. He’s not of retirement age though. I thought that must be where he went. I thought wrong. An ex-colleague, Chin Hon, shared an article this week, by an editor with the Boston Globe – and there it was, written by L. Kim Tan.

I dropped him an email to say hi, to say a long overdue word of thanks. And he replied. It’s so nice to be reconnected, to finally be able to thank someone so instrumental in my choice of a career.

It’s been a while…

An update of sorts. A couple of deadlines converged in the last couple of weeks, so blogging has taken a backseat. Now, things are slightly less hectic work wise. There are still deadlines to be met in the next few weeks, but at least they are spaced wider apart. I’ve finished my last lesson in NTU this semester. It’s been an enriching experience supervising a group of enthusiastic journalism undergrads, and I’m looking forward to seeing their bylines in the national papers soon.

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I was also busy with Sunday Times work, and I had fun interviewing a chess prodigy in the 60s for the weekly history page. Mr Tan Lian Ann is now 68 and a company managing director, but he was routinely winning adults in the game from the time he was 10 years old.

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Over on the home front, a niggling flu bug has been making its rounds the last few weeks, and we’re hopefully at the tail end of this germy season.

We’ve been keeping busy at home.

Painting Easter eggs with Shannon:

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While Jason whipped up another storm on canvas using acrylics… wpid-imag2111.jpg

We went for a school funfair – not the one in the news, but another that happened to be on the same day. Shannon declared this her favourite activity. wpid-imag2115.jpg

She had her first ballet recital, four months after starting lessons. She’s come a long way from the first time she went for a ballet trial last year!

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With the reduced prices at KidsStop – the children’s Science Centre, we went to check it out one morning. I’ve been wanting to bring Shannon there since I did the advertorial for their opening last June, but I was put off by the high admission price. So I’m glad they’ve lowered the prices. Admission to Science Centre is now free so we’ll be planning a trip there soon. Do take note of the visiting hours on KidsStop’s website if you’re heading there, they have fixed session blocks.

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I meant to do a detailed post on KidsStop, but was foiled by an absent SD card in my camera…

And here’s how we’ve been beating the heat at home. Or rather, how they have been beating the heat. One fan per person.

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Lessons from Mr Lee Kuan Yew

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Singapore’s first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew died on March 23, 2015, at 3.18am.

Being the news junkie I am, I’ve been following every bit of news closely since it was announced that he was hospitalised. When the daily updates on his worsening condition came last week, I would tell my family about it. After several days of updates last week, Shannon started asking, how is Mr Lee Kuan Yew today?

The morning he died, I was up at 6am giving Jason Brufen for high fever and the Ventolin puff for wheezing. I checked my phone for news updates after Jason went back to bed, and saw the news.

The rest of the day was spent fervently following every update that came, from watching CNA at the clinic with Jason, listening to the news in the car, to devouring all the obituaries from media around the world on my handphone. Thankfully I did not have a work deadline the last few days.

Much has been written about Mr Lee as an astute statesman, a dedicated founding Prime Minister and an intellect revered by many world leaders. But the pieces I enjoyed the most were those from his children, this one by his tutor, and another by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat on Mr Lee’s red box, which has been making its rounds online. They offer a glimpse into another side of the man not usually seen by the world.

As a parent, I’ve been wondering how to ensure my children know about the contributions of Mr Lee and other pioneering leaders of the country. My takeaway from history lessons in school were stories on Sir Stamford Raffles and Sang Nila Utama. Hopefully history textbooks have changed to include greater details on political leaders of modern Singapore. I was doing research last year for a speech I had to write, and began reading up on Singapore politics in 1965. Names like Goh Keng Swee, Toh Chin Chye and Lim Chin Siong were already familiar to me, but through the process, I found out more about the work of politicians like Ong Pang Boon, Jek Yeun Thong and Ahmad Mattar. My first thought after completing the research, was, why didn’t I learn about them in school? Perhaps I would not feel this way as a student, but in hindsight, and as a parent, I would like my children to know all the work that has gone into making Singapore what it is today and the people who did it. Coincidentally, the speech was for an event which was to take place this Friday, but has since been postponed.

My kids are born into a modern Singapore that is clean and green, and in a way, so was I. They have seen black and white images of a dirty Singapore River on TV this week and they have heard Mr Lee’s rousing speeches on the radio. I’ve been telling them what I could in the past few days. They were curious about Singaporeans crying at tribute sites and I explained why. But I’m not sure how much impact, if any, it has on them.

Mr Lee stepped down as PM when I was 12. So for my kids, he is even further removed from the world they now live in. For them to appreciate the country, they have to know what it was like in the past. As a friend wrote on FB, this past week has been a good crash course on Singapore history for many of us. Today, students in Singapore schools reflected on what Mr Lee has done for Singapore. Jason came back from school and said he thanked Mr Lee for cleaning up the Singapore River. (So the river image did go into his head!) But what happens after this week, after Mr Lee’s funeral is over on Sunday? The challenge now is to ensure this lesson continues in one way or another from next week onwards.

On a personal note, some of the sharing from Mr Lee’s children resonated with me. I’ve extracted their quotes below from media reports. He may be father of the nation, but at home, he is father to his three children, and there is much to learn from the way he and his late wife, Mdm Kwa Geok Choo, parent their children.

Not throwing their weight around:

Middle child Lee Wei Ling: “My parents always emphasised to my siblings and me that we should not behave like the PM’s children. As a result, we treated everyone – friends, labourers and Cabinet ministers – with equal respect.”

Being frugal

Lee Wei Ling: “We had to turn off water taps completely. If my parents found a dripping tap, we would get a ticking off. And when we left a room, we had to switch off lights and air-conditioners.”

Enjoying simple pleasures in life

Eldest son and current Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong: “He used to take us to go and look at trains. And we used to go to Holland Road – Tanglin Halt is called Tanglin Halt because the train stops there and there used to be a railway station there. We would go there in the evening and watch the trains come, exchange tokens with the station master. And then it goes on. It’s a great thrill and outing for us, for me. I must have been 5 to 6 years old then. And we would do that.

When we went on holidays, we went to Cameron Highlands. We went there when I was a small child. We break journey at Kuala Lumpur – we’d stay at the railway station, there was a station hotel in KL in those days … and you go and look at the trains on the platform.”

On their studies

Lee Hsien Loong: “Most years I was not top student in class or in the school but as long as you were doing your best, managing, they were okay… If you have an interest, they helped us to pursue it.”

As a father

Youngest child Lee Hsien Yang: “He always had the best interests of the country at heart. And at home, it was always the interests of his children and our mother.”

“I think parents who are good manage to guide their children along without making them feel constrained.”

 

It is a good reminder that at the end of the day, when all is said and done, your legacy is lived out by your children.

May you rest in peace, Mr Lee.

SAHM fantasies and facts

Before I left my job a year ago, I had fantasized for a long time about being a SAHM. Now that I’ve turned my fantasy into reality, I’ve also removed my rose-tinted glasses. While there are things I relish about staying home, there are also frustrating moments. Then there are plans that never came to fruition, and remain mere fantasies. Here are some of them:

Fantasy 1: I would be able to while away afternoons baking with my kids or doing crafts with them 

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Fact: I had believed I would be able to do that. I even wrote that in my last column with ST. Unfortunately, I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve baked in the past year – three. Pineapple tarts for Chinese New Year, cupcakes for Shannon’s birthday, and a rainbow cake for Mothers’ Day last year. In reality, afternoons are spent overseeing Jason’s homework or preparing dinner. Baking ranks very low in my hierarchy of things I need to do daily, if at all. An excuse would be the fact that I don’t have a helper to help with the washing up of oily cake tins and such. Crafting with the kids? Just once when both were at home sick although Shannon has helped me with other painting jobs around the home.

 

Fantasy 2: We would be able to go on fun, if not educational, outings on weekdays

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At Chek Jawa

Fact: With soccer training twice a week, Jason barely has time to finish his homework and learn his weekly Spelling and Tingxie. Any free time is spent playing with legos, chilling out watching TV, or reading. Bed time is 9pm or earlier because he is in morning session. Outings take up more time and are a luxury left for the weekend or school holidays. Perhaps things would be different if the kids were younger and not bogged down by schoolwork as yet. Meanwhile, Shannon is a homebody who is content to play at home…

 

Fantasy 3: I would have a lot of time for my hobbies

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Shannon’s table

Fact: While I have been able to find pockets of time for reading and crafting, they remain pockets. So for those who think that SAHMs have a lot of time for our interests, think again. Which brings me to my next point…

 

Fantasy 4: I would love to stay home and “do nothing” so it would be easy to say no to work

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Fact: To put it plainly, I just can’t stay home and “do nothing”. What I’ve done is to try to find a balance that works for the family. Last year, I tried a plethora of freelance work because I wanted to try most things that come my way at least once. This year, I’ve decided to be more selective about what I do. It’s still not easy to turn down work I’m interested in or if it pays well. But I’m trying, especially if it eats into family time. It’s still a juggling act in many ways.

 

Fantasy 5: I would be able to have frequent lunches with friends and go shopping whenever I want

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At a Guzheng gathering

Fact: With freelance work, housework and kids’ ferrying schedules, I’m lucky to even find time to go grocery shopping on my own. Roaming the aisles of a supermarket at leisure is a luxury, not to mention lunch and shopping with friends.

 

Fantasy 6: It would not take more than a stern look to discipline my kids

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Fact:  The icing on the cake and probably the top reason I left my job – to bond with them and avoid the teenage angst and more later on. However, right now, it takes all it takes to discipline the kids. I can contort my face into all sorts of stern looks but I still end up having to raise my voice more often than not. Work-in-progress!

 

The one fantasy that has turned into fact, is that I can spend school holidays with them without feeling guilty about work. March holidays are round the corner, yay!

 

Old school

I love technology like the next person. I use my smartphone to catch up on news, follow my favourite blogs and news feeds via the Feedly app, or Whatsapp friends and family. I also use my Macbook Air almost every day. I can’t do without it. I use it for work, for leisure, to surf the web, do online shopping etc. But while I use technology a lot, deep down, I’m old school. Continue reading

SAHM – A Year On

Feb 18 came and passed quietly. Well, maybe not quietly, there were fireworks at midnight. It was Chinese New Year Eve after all. But it also happened to be one year since I left my job and became a stay-at-home-mum(SAHM). I thought a year on would be a good time to take stock of my decision. Continue reading

Jason turns 9

Sometimes I find it hard to believe my first-born is now 9.

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Continue reading

Pineapple tarts!

IMG_0207It’s that time of the year again when I search out my old pineapple tart recipe. I don’t bake as often as I would like to throughout the year, but I make it a point to do it during Chinese New Year. We can forgo homemade for all CNY goodies, except for pineapple tarts. The mass market ones don’t appeal to us anymore. They are just not worth the calories. The buttery, crumbly, premium ones come with a premium price tag, which I’m not willing to pay for. So the next best thing? Make your own! Continue reading

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

I’ve been wanting to visit the new Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve extension since it was opened in December, and we finally did so today on a Saturday with nothing on our calendar. Bliss…

Unlike the original park, this extension features many boardwalks leading out to the sea, pods for viewing, and more opportunities to get up close with mudskippers. Continue reading

Pioneer heart patient Maureen Lim Gek Lian

I’ve been helping out with The Sunday Times ‘This Week in 1965′ page, that looks back on news events 50 years ago. Last week, I wrote about the first few patients in Singapore who went through an open heart surgery. I tried searching for them but could not find records or contacts of them anywhere. Continue reading

Papa is away

Their papa is away for reservist these two weeks, which means I’ve had to do double duty. One of the jobs I’ve had to take over was to send Jason to school in the mornings. Jason is an early riser, (the kind who jumps up the moment the alarm goes off), so is his papa. Unfortunately, I’m not, (I snooze for as long as I can…). Continue reading

Shannon and Ballet (Part 3)

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After a six-month wait, we finally decided to opt for a weekend class instead. The weekday class we wanted was not able to start as there weren’t enough pupils signing up, so after Shannon went for the first trial class, then the second, we had to wait further.  Continue reading

Shannon’s “new” table

The kids have been back to school for a week now. Jason in P3, and Shannon in K2. I’m still luxuriating in the fact that I have mornings free to do my own thing, now that both are in school in the mornings. Unfortunately, I’ve been down with a cold the past few days, so my plans to exercise and do a variety of other activities have been put on hold.

Meanwhile, Shannon was recently gifted my sister’s old study table. There is a corner in their shared bedroom where her kiddy table used to be, but I thought a proper study table would come in useful when she’s in P1 next year. Continue reading

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